Response and Restoration in The Arctic

mini-Canon - July 2, 2008 184The US’s National Ocean Service’s Office of Response and Restoration (OR&R) provides scientific solutions for marine pollution. As part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), OR&R is a center of expertise in preparing for, evaluating, and responding to threats to coastal environments. These threats could be oil and chemical spills, releases from hazardous waste sites, or marine debris.

Other U.S. Links:

Arctic-bound: Testing Oil Spill Response Technologies Aboard an Icebreaker

Breaking Ice: A Personal Journey amid Preparations for Arctic Oil Spills

Canadian Links:

ArcticNet brings together scientists and managers in the natural, human health and social sciences with their partners from Inuit organizations, northern communities, federal and provincial agencies and the private sector. The objective of ArcticNet is to study the impacts of climate change and modernization in the coastal Canadian Arctic. Over 145 ArcticNet researchers from 30 Canadian Universities, 8 federal and 11 provincial agencies and departments collaborate with research teams in Denmark, Finland, France, Greenland, Japan, Norway, Poland, Russia, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the USA.

Canadian Artcic Resources Committee; a citizens’ organization dedicated to the long-term environmental and social well being of northern Canada and its peoples.

Oceans North Canada (Part of an Oceans North Campaign led by The Pew Charitable Trust) which, in in partnership with Ducks Unlimited Canada and Oceans North Canada includes Canadian and U.S. staff that work closely with their colleagues and marine science experts at The Pew Charitable Trusts to promote northern solutions in the North American Arctic from Davis Strait to Bering Strait: promotes science- and community-based conservation of Canada’s Arctic Ocean and the resulting well-being of indigenous Arctic residents who rely upon its natural wealth. Working with Arctic residents in Canada, we support science-based policies consistent with indigenous land claims and traditional practices for sustainable commercial fishing, environmentally responsible offshore hydrocarbon development and oil spill standards, and appropriate Arctic shipping safety rules.

International Links:

English: Arctic Council members map

English: Arctic Council members map (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Arctic CouncilThe Ottawa Declaration of 1996 formally established the Arctic Council as a high level intergovernmental forum to provide a means for promoting cooperation, coordination and interaction among the Arctic States, with the involvement of the Arctic Indigenous communities and other Arctic inhabitants on common Arctic issues, in particular issues of sustainable development and environmental protection in the Arctic. Arctic Council Member States are Canada, Denmark (including Greenland and the Faroe Islands), Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russian Federation, Sweden, and the United States of America. In addition to the Member States, the Arctic Council has the category of Permanent Participants.

The Arctic Council Indigenous Peoples’ Secretariat (IPS) is a support Secretariat for the International Indigenous Peoples’ Organizations that have Permanent Participant status in the Arctic Council.

Enhanced by Zemanta
Posted in Pollution. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »

How the oceans can clean themselves (of plastic): Boyan Slat at TEDxDelft

For many years I have been concerned for the future of our planet. Not only about Global Warming but also with Global Water and Food Shortages as they will affect our grandchildren. We have been introducing masses of plastics into our oceans; plastics which are being ingested by ocean creatures, one of our major food sources, leading to their starvation.

Please see also, August 14, 2013, 5 Gyres – Understanding Plastic Pollution

How the oceans can clean themselves (of plastic): Boyan Slat at TEDxDelft

Published on Oct 24, 2012

Boyan Slat (@BoyanSlat, Delft, 1994) combines environmentalism, creativity and technology to tackle global issues of sustainability. Currently working on oceanic plastic pollution, he believes current prevention measures will have to be supplemented by active removal of plastics in order to succeed. With his concept called Marine Litter Extraction, Boyan Slat proposes a radical clean-up solution, for which he won the Best Technical Design award 2012 at the TU Delft.

Where millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food chains, Boyan sees opportunities to combat this. While researching ocean plastics during school holidays, he performed analysis on various fundamental topics (including particle sizes, plastic/plankton separation and the amount of plastic in the oceans), leading up to the first realistic concept for cleaning up the world’s oceans.

Now a first-year Aerospace Engineering student at the TU Delft, Boyan has always been passionate about applying technology in an original way (at age fourteen he set a world record with launching 213 water rockets), and as an (underwater)photographer and videographer witnesses environmental degradation through his very own eyes.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)

Posted in Pollution. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Leave a Comment »

5 Gyres – Understanding Plastic Pollution

There are five major ocean-wide gyres — the No...

There are five major ocean-wide gyres — the North Atlantic, South Atlantic, North Pacific, South Pacific, and Indian Ocean gyres. Each is flanked by a strong and narrow “western boundary current,” and a weak and broad “eastern boundary current”. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

www.http://5gyres.org/

5 Gyres – Understanding Plastic Pollution Through Exploration, Education, and Action
All of our trash eventually just goes down and out to sea; not helped by our increasing use of non-biodegradable plastics. The Great Pacific (Gyre) and other garbage patches – (copy and past the following in your browser)
“Did you know that in the past decade, more and more personal care products sold in The United States and around the world contain micro-plastic particle abrasives employed as an exfoliant? We think this is one of the most egregious sources of plastic pollution because this plastic is actually designed to be washed down the drain. ”

Enhanced by Zemanta
A Word in Your Ear

Stories and Photographs of my travels, Tales of friends, family, animals and my life

Plus Ultra

Stories and photographs from places “further beyond”.

The Iris and the Lily

GAIA'S HEARTBEAT experience the pulsing earth in photos

Henry's Failed Experiments

A photography blog

Lens Cap

Casual glimpes into mundane suburbia

Places Unknown

Dmitrii Lezine's Places Unknown is fine art and travel photography from around the world. Enjoy!

Googsy Photography

My Favorite Clicks....

The Bookshelf of Emily J.

life~lessons~literature

avant garden 365

a photo blog by terra rathai

Photo Nature Blog

Nature Photography by Jeffrey Foltice

Matt on Not-WordPress

Stuff and things.

Relax--

God didn't go anywhere!

Idnaminomicon

Witty bitchicisms and assorted nonsense

The Truth Ache

The Life of A Mentally Ill Writer

The Daily Post

The Art and Craft of Blogging

Putney Farm

Get some good food. Cook it. Share with friends. Have a cocktail.

Melissa Writes of Passage

1 Family. 6 Languages. 10 Countries. 1 Writer. Always at Home.