Yakutsk, Sakha Republic, Russian Federation: This is the coldest city on Earth – with a population over 100,000, but people still choose to live here.

While people in Canada and the US are in the middle of a series of polar vortex’, in the city of Yakutsk, locals continue daily life in -45C (-49F). With an extreme subarctic climate in Russia’s far east, Yakutsk in the Continental Subarctic or Boreal (taiga) climates is generally considered the coldest city in the world. The Sakha Republic seems proud of the fact that they are the source of much of the polar vortex’ in the northern hemisphere – cold and frost. However, much also comes from northern Canada and Greenland.

What would draw so many people to the Sakha Republic? As a result of a meteor impact, they say they have 27% of the world’s diamond reserves – enough to supply the entire world for 3,000 years. They also have many other strategic resources including coal, hydro and gas and oil.

Republic Sakha-Yakutia. A promotional Video Presentation. 2013 – It certainly doesn’t always look like this in winter.

Published on Jun 18, 2013

A new video promotional presentation that features all the aspects of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia), Russia’s Siberia – http://AskYakutia.com & http://eYakutia.com
Yakutia is the biggest Russian region located in East Siberia and the Far East.
This video was officially released by the Government of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) and edited by Eugene Osipov in 2013

-51С in Yakutsk, Yakutia, Siberia / Russia. Walking. Yakutsk Weather

Uploaded on Jan 10, 2012

Experience Yakutsk winter weather with http://VisitYakutia.com

Learn about living in Yakutsk in winter & its weather at http://AskYakutia.com (info) and http://eYakutia.com (photos & videos)
Walking in the center of Yakutsk City, Republic of Sakha-Yakutia, Siberia / Russia. It’s cold today. -51C.
Follow my daily Yakutsk winter weather & travel photographs on Twitter: http://twitter.com/yakutia
Russian Asteroid Crater Has Over $1 Quadrillion of Diamonds

Video: Best information on Yakutia (which makes up 20% of all of Russia – 13x the size of France): The coldest place on earth – RT (English Russian TV) 120108; See also Video: From Siberia with Love #3 – Home in Yakutsk, Siberia

Yakutsk: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

With an subarctic climate (Köppen climate classification: Dfd), Yakutsk has the coldest winter temperatures for any city. Average monthly temperatures range from +19.5°C (67.1°F) in July to −38.6°C (−37.5°F) in January, and only Norilsk has a lower mean annual temperature for any settlement of over 100,000.

If snow and cold weather where you live has you down, be glad you’re not a resident of Yakutsk. The Siberian outpost, population 270,000, is said to be the coldest city in the world, according to the Guardian and other reports.

Located 3,100 miles by air from Moscow, the remote city in the far east of Russia hits temperatures as low as -49 degrees Fahrenheit. Friday’s forecast is a frigid -42 degrees Fahrenheit.

That seems almost balmy compared with the coldest recorded temperature: -83 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the Moscow Times.

While the extremely low mercury would send most of us into hibernation, locals continue with their daily life, which means going outside in extreme conditions, bundled up from head to toe in parkas, furs, and woollens.

This kind of cold is no joke: In addition to weather so severe it can give you frostbite while running errands, there’s also the freezing fog, which limits visibility to 20 or 30 feet.

Despite these obvious weather challenges, the city, located along the Lena River, about 280 miles south of the Arctic Circle, is a major port town. It is also the site of diamond and gold extraction, along with oil and gas production — which has the side benefit of keeping the “frost encrusted houses” in steady supply of much-needed heat.

Many homes are built on stilts because of the year-round permafrost, notes Lonely Planet. When the short-lived spring arrives, icy roads turn to muddy muck. It’s the one time of year when residents can’t cross the usually iced-over river — which has no bridge.

Summers, by the way, are short, hot and mosquito filled, so maybe year-round winter doesn’t seem so bad after all.

Of course, other lower temperature have been recorded on Earth. The lowest temperature ever recorded in the world was at the Russian Station in the Antartica – Vostok Station −89.2°C (−128.6°F) on July 21 1983 (our summer, in the sourthern hemisphere, is their winter) in North America the coldest temperature on record was recorded at Snag, Yukon −63°C (−81°F) on February 3, 1947.

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